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20110701
20110731
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place than does greece. greece has two problems. first, it has a big budget deficit and markets have lost faith that it can ever repay its loans. second, it is an unproductive economy and cannot generate enough economic growth over the next few decades. in economies, degree has a liquidity problem but also a solvency problem. the united states, by contrast, does not have a solvency problem. the american economy remains one of the world's most competitive with many of the fastest-growing companies in most of the advanced industries. it houses the best capital markets in the world, the greatest universities, the most dynamic society. america is demographically vibrant thanks to immigration. it will be the only rich country that will see its population grow over the next 25 years. america could face a liquidity problem, that is it could have difficulty financing its debts and deficits if markets lose faith in it, again, let's be clear. this has not happened yet. in fact, right now, the world is lending to america more cheaply than ever before. the most important difference between greec
a crime. it has been a rape or an attempt of rape. it is a big crime, and it will have to be punished. >> simon schama, in his column at "the daily beast," bernard henri-levy said this is like ropes spear. you wrote a book on the french revolution. do you think there's any -- >> i can understand bernard's passion about that, but as we know, the guillotine was the conclusion of that. that's not exactly what happened to dominique strauss-kahn. what i wanted to say to bernard and the discussion is that much of what he says i share, but i think it boils down to this kind of very lurid relationship between the tabloid press and the nature of criminal prosecution, spectacular. criminal prosecution or criminal apprehension, potential criminal apprehension, as a kind of public spectacle. >> like the casey anthony trial. >> yes. exactly. there is something in american public life, actually, which assumes it not to be problematic, actually, to make it a show before any guilt is necessarily proven. >> you have this tendency, also in france, and it was even more severe and as severe concerning fr
committee comes out with." the most important point he makes is this is going to look like a big win for the republicans today because of the cuts and the balanced budget inclusion in this contemplated agreement. but a big loss in the fall if the super committee plan actually passes huge cuts, say, to defense. and so this is one of the things we're seeing here. we know that mitch mcconnell is going to be working hard to get support in the united states senate. we also know that in the republican party it does not look like he's going to give 100% support from where he stands right now, wolf. >> no, but the question is will they get the majority, even get 60 votes in order to get anything really important done in the united states senate. as you know, joe, and you've covered capitol hill for many years, you almost always need 60 votes. so right now there are 51 democrats, two debts who caucus with the democrats, and 47 republicans. i think if harry reid and mitch mcconnell are jointly on board with the president of the united states, i think it's fair to say they will have more than 6
they do it? right now they're funding existing windmill technology. out want them to place big bets for technologies of future? >> yes. fundamentally if you give $100 billion in solar panels, you probably pay $95 billion in existing en efficient technology. the last $5 billion goes to research and development and new technology. that's great. if what we wanted was to get the new technology that eventually everyone will buy, we should have spend all the hundred billion on research and development. the trick is to not buy technology too early. if you think about computers in the 1950s, if you wanted computers to be cheaper so eventually everyone could buy them, the answer was not to promise to buy a computer for every american family in 1960. that would have been terrible. it was not to tax alternative technology, tax the typewriter and hope we get better computers. it was dramatically invested in research and development which is what we did in the space race and the military technology. that actually got us to a place where ibm and apple were making computers that everyone wants to
people who come here for our education opportunities. it's a big mistake. that is the natural resource of all natural resources, the most important of all, what's up here, ideas, ingenuity, for sight, all of that. as canada is being, we ought to be a place they all want to be and come on over, we need you. what would we be without immigration? think of who would never have become an american without immigration. that's who we are, thank goodness. >> powerful words. david mccollough. thank you. we will be right back to talk about a time when america and americans were fascinated by france. david mccollough's new book when we come back. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] more people are leaving bmw, mercedes, and lexus for audi than ever before. ♪ experience the summer of audi event and get over 130 channels of siriusxm satellite radio for three months at no charge. isn't some optional pursuit. a privilege for the ultra-wealthy. it's a necessity. i find investments with e-trade's top 5 lists. quickly. easily. i use pre-defined screeners and insightful trading ideas to dig deeper. work smar
to kind of place big bets for technologies of the future? >> yes. fundamentally, if you give $100 billion in solar panels, you get -- you probably pay 95 approximate billion in exist eninefficient technology. that's great. but if what we wanted was to get the new technology that eventually everyone, including the chinese and indians will buy, we should have spent all of it on research and technology. the trick is not to buy it too early. if you a allow me a metaphor. if you think back to the computers in the 1950s, if you wanted them to be cheaper so everyone could buy them, the answer was not to promise to buy a computer for every american family in the 1960s. it was terrible. tax a typewriter and hope that we get better computers. it was to dramatically invest in research, which is what we did with the space technology and that got us to a place where apple and ibm were making computers that everyone wanted to buy. in europe there is a big movement for banning the patio heaters because they felt that was luxury. you're supposed to freeze outside. and at the end of the day it shouldn't b
opportunities. it's a big mistake. that is the natural resource of all natural resources, the most important of all, what's up here, ideas, ingenuity, foresight, all of that. training. we ought to be, as canada is being, we ought to be a place they all want to be and come on over, we need you. what would we be without immigration? think of who would never have become an american without immigration. that's who we are, thank goodness. >> powerful words. david mccullough. thank you. we will be right back to talk about a time when america and americans were fascinated by france. david mccullough's new book when we come back. ♪ let me entertain you ♪ let me make you smile ♪ let me do a few tricks ♪ some old and then some new tricks ♪ ♪ i'm very versatile ♪ so let me entertain you ♪ and we'll have a real good time ♪ [ male announcer ] with beats audio and flash, you can experience richer music and download movies straight to the new hp touchpad with webos. really? 25 grams of protein. what do we have? all four of us, together? 24. he's low fat, too, and has 5 grams of sugars. i'
anyone else, this consumer demand, if you could get back up to 15 million cars, it would make a big difference. does this incredible month or two of rangeling in washington and the sense we can't get our house in order and we're so divided, do you think this hurts in a measurable way? >> well, you're right. nature abhors a vacuum and markets abhor uncertainty. uncertainty undermines consumer confidence. consumer spending in our country accounts for about 65% to 70 pushes of the gdp. when consumers lose confidence, they hesitate, not as xwul lish, not spending money. it does have an impact on the economy. but there are all sorts of uncertainties youchlt name one. the oil spikes earlier in this year. we got off to a pretty good start in 2011. then oil spiked above $100 a barrel. that particularly concerned our industry. then there was the tragic earthquake and tsunami in japan. that threw a lot of uncertainty into our industry. so there are all sorts of uncertainty. that's what we get paid to do, is to manage through that. it keeps me awake at night. >> the world you're describing is
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)